Tuesday, July 31, 2007

"When Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni premiered his film L'Avventura at the Cannes Film Festival in 1960, he challenged the accepted concept of narrative cinema with his unique cinematic vision. The film rejected action in favor of contemplation, foregrounded compostion and design over character and plot, and offered no resolutions to conflicts that were only minimally presented."

- Author and film scholar Susan Doll looks at the late master's life and work at Facets Features at Facets.org.

"When Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni premiered his film L'Avventura at the Cannes Film Festival in 1960, he challenged the accepted concept of narrative cinema with his unique cinematic vision. The film rejected action in favor of contemplation, foregrounded compostion and design over character and plot, and offered no resolutions to conflicts that were only minimally presented."

- Author and film scholar Susan Doll looks at the late master's life and work at Facets Features at Facets.org.

Monday, July 30, 2007

Ingmar Bergman's masterpiece Cries and Whispers is the film that drove me to writing about film as a profession. Its screening in an "Existentialism in Literature and Film" course in college and the subsequent, required post-film paper deconstructing its many layers and emotions were stunning revelations. To put it simply, I figured it out: Digging into cinema was what I wanted (and needed) to do. Thank you, Ingmar.
- Phil Morehart

More remembrances...

"This agonized Swede was a surgeon who operated on himself. He cut into his own fears, analyzed his failings, perhaps sought forgiveness through art. He may never have found that expiation; he lived his last years alone on remote Faro island, speaking only rarely with his old friends and colleagues. But when he died today at 89, Bergman left behind him a worldwide colony of devotees, and a collection of spare, severe dramas unique in their intensity and impact." - Richard Corliss in Time.

"Was Bergman in touch with the European mind of his generation? Perhaps he simply was the mind of his generation. Of the great post-war directors, he was the one who shouldered the burden of moral questions: is there a God? Is there a God who is exists, but is absent? Should we behave as if God exists, if we suspect he doesn't? If he is merely absent for some unknowable millennial span, then how should we interpret this indifference, or this rebuke? And why, finally, does anything exist at all?" - Peter Bradshaw in The Guardian, which also has an extensive section devoted to the late director.

"Of all the thoughts that pour into my head on the death of Ingmar Bergman at the age of 89, the sharpest has as much to do with theater as cinema — or, rather, with the feverish interplay between the two media that persisted into the final years of his roiling psyche." - David Edelstein in New York Magazine.

"Another thunder lizard falls – over a half-century after what has come to be known as "the art film" emerged onto postwar American screens, the Greatest Generation (semi-irony siren, please) takes another hit with the passing of an 89-year-old Ingmar Bergman, at once a dinosaur, a one-man New Wave, a mammoth formal influence, a pioneering pop existentialist, a despot in his own nation of cinematic currency, an unexploitable navel-focused artiste who did not bow to the world’s entertainment will but instead made it bow to him, an unestimable provider of cultural fuel to the rise of college-educated counter culture between 1959 and 1980, and, let’s face it, an astonishingly adventurous sensibility that embraced virtually every stripe of expression available to him, from melodrama to the world’s most overt symbolism to gritty realism to epic pageant, farce and avant-garde psycho-obscurism." - Michael Atkinson.

"There were times, while watching an Ingmar Bergman movie, when you’d think to yourself, it’s like they invented black and white photography just so this man could make films." - Malcolm Jones in Newsweek.

"Of the hundereds of thousands of words which will be written and spoken about the death of film director Ingmar Bergman, including these words, you will be better off watching any one of his films, even if you've already seen it. He was the last of the giants." - Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

Head to one of Facets Features' favorite film blogs, Greencine Daily, for more.

Ingmar Bergman's masterpiece Cries and Whispers is the film that drove me to writing about film as a profession. Its screening in an "Existentialism in Literature and Film" course in college and the subsequent, required post-film paper deconstructing its many layers and emotions were stunning revelations. To put it simply, I figured it out: Digging into cinema was what I wanted (and needed) to do. Thank you, Ingmar.
- Phil Morehart

More remembrances...

"This agonized Swede was a surgeon who operated on himself. He cut into his own fears, analyzed his failings, perhaps sought forgiveness through art. He may never have found that expiation; he lived his last years alone on remote Faro island, speaking only rarely with his old friends and colleagues. But when he died today at 89, Bergman left behind him a worldwide colony of devotees, and a collection of spare, severe dramas unique in their intensity and impact." - Richard Corliss in Time.

"Was Bergman in touch with the European mind of his generation? Perhaps he simply was the mind of his generation. Of the great post-war directors, he was the one who shouldered the burden of moral questions: is there a God? Is there a God who is exists, but is absent? Should we behave as if God exists, if we suspect he doesn't? If he is merely absent for some unknowable millennial span, then how should we interpret this indifference, or this rebuke? And why, finally, does anything exist at all?" - Peter Bradshaw in The Guardian, which also has an extensive section devoted to the late director.

"Of all the thoughts that pour into my head on the death of Ingmar Bergman at the age of 89, the sharpest has as much to do with theater as cinema — or, rather, with the feverish interplay between the two media that persisted into the final years of his roiling psyche." - David Edelstein in New York Magazine.

"Another thunder lizard falls – over a half-century after what has come to be known as "the art film" emerged onto postwar American screens, the Greatest Generation (semi-irony siren, please) takes another hit with the passing of an 89-year-old Ingmar Bergman, at once a dinosaur, a one-man New Wave, a mammoth formal influence, a pioneering pop existentialist, a despot in his own nation of cinematic currency, an unexploitable navel-focused artiste who did not bow to the world’s entertainment will but instead made it bow to him, an unestimable provider of cultural fuel to the rise of college-educated counter culture between 1959 and 1980, and, let’s face it, an astonishingly adventurous sensibility that embraced virtually every stripe of expression available to him, from melodrama to the world’s most overt symbolism to gritty realism to epic pageant, farce and avant-garde psycho-obscurism." - Michael Atkinson.

"There were times, while watching an Ingmar Bergman movie, when you’d think to yourself, it’s like they invented black and white photography just so this man could make films." - Malcolm Jones in Newsweek.

"Of the hundereds of thousands of words which will be written and spoken about the death of film director Ingmar Bergman, including these words, you will be better off watching any one of his films, even if you've already seen it. He was the last of the giants." - Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

Head to one of Facets Features' favorite film blogs, Greencine Daily, for more.

Friday, July 27, 2007



For those of you traveling (like me), have a good Weekend.


- Phil Morehart



For those of you traveling (like me), have a good Weekend.


- Phil Morehart

Thursday, July 26, 2007

"I didn't think it was possible to break any more movie taboos yet somehow David Wain succeeded with The Ten," says Alex Geana at The Huffington Post.

Quentin Tarantino is bringing spaghetti westerns to Venice, says BBC News.

"Films by Claude Chabrol, Céline Sciamma, Jorge Sanchez-Cabezudo, Javier Rebollo, Alex von Wamerdam and Nadine Labaki are among the European productions and co-productions to be released in French cinemas from July 25 to August 15. Although up against a horde of US titles, European releases are expected to do well this summer," notes Cineuropa.

Woah! David Lynch is filming bonus material for an upcoming Twin Peaks boxset, according to The Guardian.


- Phil Morehart

"I didn't think it was possible to break any more movie taboos yet somehow David Wain succeeded with The Ten," says Alex Geana at The Huffington Post.

Quentin Tarantino is bringing spaghetti westerns to Venice, says BBC News.

"Films by Claude Chabrol, Céline Sciamma, Jorge Sanchez-Cabezudo, Javier Rebollo, Alex von Wamerdam and Nadine Labaki are among the European productions and co-productions to be released in French cinemas from July 25 to August 15. Although up against a horde of US titles, European releases are expected to do well this summer," notes Cineuropa.

Woah! David Lynch is filming bonus material for an upcoming Twin Peaks boxset, according to The Guardian.


- Phil Morehart

Wednesday, July 25, 2007



Korean director Kim Ki-Duk singing at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.


- Phil Morehart



Korean director Kim Ki-Duk singing at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.


- Phil Morehart

Tuesday, July 24, 2007


"With the new Batman movie shooting on the streets of Chicago at the moment, it's a good time to remember how those streets looked on film a century ago."
- The Chicago Tribune looks at Essanay Films and Chicago's history in the film world.

"Fancy making your own silent film - with the very camera used by Charlie Chaplin in 1918? It's yours for about £90,000," says Sarfraz Manzoor in The Guardian.

Lohan. Busted. Again.

Apple has a trailer for Wes Anderson's new film, The Darjeeling Limited.

Laszlo Kovacs, legendary cinematographer for Peter Bogdanovich (Targets, Paper Moon, What's Up, Doc?), Martin Scorsese (New York, New York, The Last Waltz), Robert Altman (That Cold Day in the Park) and Bob Rafelson (Five Easy Pieces, The King of Marvin Gardens), among many, many others, has died. He was 74.


- Phil Morehart


"With the new Batman movie shooting on the streets of Chicago at the moment, it's a good time to remember how those streets looked on film a century ago."
- The Chicago Tribune looks at Essanay Films and Chicago's history in the film world.

"Fancy making your own silent film - with the very camera used by Charlie Chaplin in 1918? It's yours for about £90,000," says Sarfraz Manzoor in The Guardian.

Lohan. Busted. Again.

Apple has a trailer for Wes Anderson's new film, The Darjeeling Limited.

Laszlo Kovacs, legendary cinematographer for Peter Bogdanovich (Targets, Paper Moon, What's Up, Doc?), Martin Scorsese (New York, New York, The Last Waltz), Robert Altman (That Cold Day in the Park) and Bob Rafelson (Five Easy Pieces, The King of Marvin Gardens), among many, many others, has died. He was 74.


- Phil Morehart

Monday, July 23, 2007


Gavin Lambert was a screenwriter, film critic and biographer, perhaps best known for his Oscar-nominated screenplays for I Never Promised You a Rose Garden and Sons and Lovers and his Tennessee Williams adaptation, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone. He also directed one film, Another Sky, which was saved from obscurity by Facets and restored from the original 35mm negative in the archive of the British Film Institute.

Lambert, who died in 2005 from pulmonary fibrosis, was born on July 23rd, 1924. On what would be Lambert’s 83rd birthday, Facets celebrates his work.



Another Sky (1954)
The only film directed by Gavin Lambert unfolds around a demure and prim governess who arrives in Marrakesh, Morocco to begin a new job as a paid companion to a wealthy English expatriate. As she explores her exotic surroundings, she is seduced by the men, music, and mystery of her new home. The dreamy black-and-white cinematography of Walter Lassally captures the steamy atmosphere of North Africa in the 1950s. "Hypnotic" (Village Voice).



Bitter Victory (1957)
Lambert scripted this actioner from director Nichola’s Ray in which Richard Burton and Curd Jurgens play rival military officers who are assigned to execute a daring commando raid on General Rommel's fortress during WWII.



Sons and Lovers (1960)
Lambert received a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar nomination for this D.H. Lawrence adaptation.



The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961)
A predatory gigolo preys upon a vulnerable middle-aged actress seeking love--and willing to pay for it--in this Lambert-penned adaptation of Tennessee Williams' novel. With Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty and Lotte Lenya.



Inside Daisy Clover (1965)
Robert Mulligan (To Kill a Mockingbird) directed this adaptation of Lambert's novel about a Hollywood starlet's (Natalie Wood) rise and fall. With Robert Redford, Christopher Plummer, Ruth Gordon and Roddy McDowall.



I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1977)
Lambert earned another Oscar nomination for this drama based on the best-selling autobiographical novel by Joanne Greenberg about a bright 16-year-old ( Kathleen Quinlan) who is institutionalized for three years in a mental hospital.



Sweet Bird of Youth (1989)
Lambert scripted this Nicolas Roeg directed, made-for-television adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play about the obsessive relationship between a faded movie star (Elizabeth Taylor) and her ambitious, handsome lover (Mark Harmon).


- Phil Morehart


Gavin Lambert was a screenwriter, film critic and biographer, perhaps best known for his Oscar-nominated screenplays for I Never Promised You a Rose Garden and Sons and Lovers and his Tennessee Williams adaptation, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone. He also directed one film, Another Sky, which was saved from obscurity by Facets and restored from the original 35mm negative in the archive of the British Film Institute.

Lambert, who died in 2005 from pulmonary fibrosis, was born on July 23rd, 1924. On what would be Lambert’s 83rd birthday, Facets celebrates his work.



Another Sky (1954)
The only film directed by Gavin Lambert unfolds around a demure and prim governess who arrives in Marrakesh, Morocco to begin a new job as a paid companion to a wealthy English expatriate. As she explores her exotic surroundings, she is seduced by the men, music, and mystery of her new home. The dreamy black-and-white cinematography of Walter Lassally captures the steamy atmosphere of North Africa in the 1950s. "Hypnotic" (Village Voice).



Bitter Victory (1957)
Lambert scripted this actioner from director Nichola’s Ray in which Richard Burton and Curd Jurgens play rival military officers who are assigned to execute a daring commando raid on General Rommel's fortress during WWII.



Sons and Lovers (1960)
Lambert received a Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar nomination for this D.H. Lawrence adaptation.



The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961)
A predatory gigolo preys upon a vulnerable middle-aged actress seeking love--and willing to pay for it--in this Lambert-penned adaptation of Tennessee Williams' novel. With Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty and Lotte Lenya.



Inside Daisy Clover (1965)
Robert Mulligan (To Kill a Mockingbird) directed this adaptation of Lambert's novel about a Hollywood starlet's (Natalie Wood) rise and fall. With Robert Redford, Christopher Plummer, Ruth Gordon and Roddy McDowall.



I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1977)
Lambert earned another Oscar nomination for this drama based on the best-selling autobiographical novel by Joanne Greenberg about a bright 16-year-old ( Kathleen Quinlan) who is institutionalized for three years in a mental hospital.



Sweet Bird of Youth (1989)
Lambert scripted this Nicolas Roeg directed, made-for-television adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play about the obsessive relationship between a faded movie star (Elizabeth Taylor) and her ambitious, handsome lover (Mark Harmon).


- Phil Morehart


The Old Dark House (James Whale, 1932) - The perfect cast and director for a spooky, thunderclaps-rattlin' the floorboards thriller. Have a potato. (Phil Morehart)

The Films of Kenneth Anger: Volume One (Kenneth Anger, 1947-54) - An enchanting set of early Anger shorts. Rumor has it that Scorpio Rising and Lucifer Rising will be included in the upcoming Vol. Two. (PM)

Broken English (Zoe Cassavetes, 2007) - Parker Posey is perpetually 30 years old. (PM)

The Woman in the Window (Fritz Lang, 1944) - Find my review of Lang's noir classic at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

Avenue Montaigne (Daniele Thompson, 2006) - Again, head to Cincinnati CityBeat's website for my review. (PM)

Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, 1997) - The "real" story behind Herzog's Rescue Dawn is its essential supplement, as each fills in blanks that the other omits. (PM)

Paris Je T'Aime (various directors, 2007) - I agree wholeheartedly with Rosemary's review. Having just vacationed in Paris recently, Paris Je T'Aime refreshed memories on the verge of dissipation. Sitting in the cinemaplex's 3rd row helped immensely, magnifying the arrondissements and their idiosyncracies to an extreme reminiscent of my visit. (PM)

Lady Chatterley (Pascale Ferran, 2007) - The restraints of decorum are broken when a love affair blossoms between Lady Chatterley (Marina Hands) and her estate’s gamekeeper (Jean-Louis Coullo'ch). You play witness to some of their most intimate scenes… galloping across a field in the rain completely nude. Prepare to be well acquainted with the characters after the near 3 hours it takes to tell their tale, but it’s certainly a tale worth telling. Think Sense and Sensibility meets Red Shoes Diaries and all in French. Oh la la. (Rosemary Nottoli)

Twin Peaks: Season 2 - “That gum you like is going to come back in style.” (Dan Mucha)

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (David Lynch, 1992) - “The owls are not what they seem.” (DM)

Armageddon (Michael Bay, 1998) – These colors don’t run, but they do blow up asteroids. (Brian Elza)

The Covenant (Renny Harlan, 2006) – This teen warlock movie wouldn’t exist without tight abs, CGI spiders, and The Lost Boys. All of these things are rad on their own, but when they form a covenant…not so much. (BE)

Dreamscape (Joseph Ruben, 1984)Max von Sydow enlists a psychic Dennis Quaid to enter the dreaming minds of troubled patients and help them resolve emotional problems. David Patrick Kelly (Twin Peaks’ Jerry Horne) is all “F that,” and invades the dreamscape as a snakeman, biting jerks with his mind. (BE)

Ghost Rider (Mark Steven Johnson, 2007) – I’m just a glutton for punishment. At a bare minimum, Nicolas Cage puts forth an effort to make this comic book movie pleasurable. His daredevil character drinks jellybeans from a martini glass, listens to The Carpenters like the word of God, and jumps over a football field of whirring Apache helicopters as “Paranoid” blares on the soundtrack. (BE)

Grosse Pointe Blank (George Armitage, 1997) – The reasons I fell in love with this hitman sleeper haven’t changed, but I’ve picked up a couple new ones: Dan Aykroyd yelling “Popcorn!” before whacking people; Alan Arkin as a shrink fearfully psychoanalyzing a professional killer (John Cusack) a good two years before Analyze This. (BE)

Live Free or Die Hard (Len Wiseman, 2007) – If you were sick and stuck in a 100-degree Chicago apartment, you’d stagger out to a cool theater and see Bruce Willis jump on a plane and make fun of the Mac guy. “Why don’t you and your inter-friends stop all that ‘hacking’ and meet some chicks, man.” (BE)

Mimic (Guillermo del Toro, 1997) – Compared to its creature feature contemporaries like The Relic, Species, and Phantoms, del Toro’s knack for subterranean atmospherics stands out in sharp relief. (BE)

Sky High (Mike Mitchell, 2005) – So they went ahead and made a live-action version of The Incredibles with Kurt Russell. Sold. (BE)

The Wendell Baker Story (Andrew Wilson/Luke Wilson, 2005) - It was cute and enjoyable, but given the talent involved, Luke, Owen, and Andrew Wilson should track down Wes Anderson and never let go. (BE)


The Old Dark House (James Whale, 1932) - The perfect cast and director for a spooky, thunderclaps-rattlin' the floorboards thriller. Have a potato. (Phil Morehart)

The Films of Kenneth Anger: Volume One (Kenneth Anger, 1947-54) - An enchanting set of early Anger shorts. Rumor has it that Scorpio Rising and Lucifer Rising will be included in the upcoming Vol. Two. (PM)

Broken English (Zoe Cassavetes, 2007) - Parker Posey is perpetually 30 years old. (PM)

The Woman in the Window (Fritz Lang, 1944) - Find my review of Lang's noir classic at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

Avenue Montaigne (Daniele Thompson, 2006) - Again, head to Cincinnati CityBeat's website for my review. (PM)

Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, 1997) - The "real" story behind Herzog's Rescue Dawn is its essential supplement, as each fills in blanks that the other omits. (PM)

Paris Je T'Aime (various directors, 2007) - I agree wholeheartedly with Rosemary's review. Having just vacationed in Paris recently, Paris Je T'Aime refreshed memories on the verge of dissipation. Sitting in the cinemaplex's 3rd row helped immensely, magnifying the arrondissements and their idiosyncracies to an extreme reminiscent of my visit. (PM)

Lady Chatterley (Pascale Ferran, 2007) - The restraints of decorum are broken when a love affair blossoms between Lady Chatterley (Marina Hands) and her estate’s gamekeeper (Jean-Louis Coullo'ch). You play witness to some of their most intimate scenes… galloping across a field in the rain completely nude. Prepare to be well acquainted with the characters after the near 3 hours it takes to tell their tale, but it’s certainly a tale worth telling. Think Sense and Sensibility meets Red Shoes Diaries and all in French. Oh la la. (Rosemary Nottoli)

Twin Peaks: Season 2 - “That gum you like is going to come back in style.” (Dan Mucha)

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (David Lynch, 1992) - “The owls are not what they seem.” (DM)

Armageddon (Michael Bay, 1998) – These colors don’t run, but they do blow up asteroids. (Brian Elza)

The Covenant (Renny Harlan, 2006) – This teen warlock movie wouldn’t exist without tight abs, CGI spiders, and The Lost Boys. All of these things are rad on their own, but when they form a covenant…not so much. (BE)

Dreamscape (Joseph Ruben, 1984)Max von Sydow enlists a psychic Dennis Quaid to enter the dreaming minds of troubled patients and help them resolve emotional problems. David Patrick Kelly (Twin Peaks’ Jerry Horne) is all “F that,” and invades the dreamscape as a snakeman, biting jerks with his mind. (BE)

Ghost Rider (Mark Steven Johnson, 2007) – I’m just a glutton for punishment. At a bare minimum, Nicolas Cage puts forth an effort to make this comic book movie pleasurable. His daredevil character drinks jellybeans from a martini glass, listens to The Carpenters like the word of God, and jumps over a football field of whirring Apache helicopters as “Paranoid” blares on the soundtrack. (BE)

Grosse Pointe Blank (George Armitage, 1997) – The reasons I fell in love with this hitman sleeper haven’t changed, but I’ve picked up a couple new ones: Dan Aykroyd yelling “Popcorn!” before whacking people; Alan Arkin as a shrink fearfully psychoanalyzing a professional killer (John Cusack) a good two years before Analyze This. (BE)

Live Free or Die Hard (Len Wiseman, 2007) – If you were sick and stuck in a 100-degree Chicago apartment, you’d stagger out to a cool theater and see Bruce Willis jump on a plane and make fun of the Mac guy. “Why don’t you and your inter-friends stop all that ‘hacking’ and meet some chicks, man.” (BE)

Mimic (Guillermo del Toro, 1997) – Compared to its creature feature contemporaries like The Relic, Species, and Phantoms, del Toro’s knack for subterranean atmospherics stands out in sharp relief. (BE)

Sky High (Mike Mitchell, 2005) – So they went ahead and made a live-action version of The Incredibles with Kurt Russell. Sold. (BE)

The Wendell Baker Story (Andrew Wilson/Luke Wilson, 2005) - It was cute and enjoyable, but given the talent involved, Luke, Owen, and Andrew Wilson should track down Wes Anderson and never let go. (BE)

Friday, July 20, 2007

"I felt humiliated and to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci. After the scene, Marlon didn't console me or apologise. Thankfully, there was just one take." - Maria Schneider talks about Last Tango in Paris on its 35th anniversary, in The Daily Mail.

Over 100 new titles in Poland, 350 features and shorts and 600 screenings in total is what the seventh edition of the Era New Horizons International Festival promises its public, notes Cineuropa.

The Sarajevo Film Festival, which runs Aug. 17-25, will hold its first ever Talent Campus this season. It will be run in co-operation with the Berlinale's successful Talent Campus.

Pirate copies of hit Czech pic Empties circulating on the Internet have been traced back to the Czech ministry of culture, reports Variety.

Sherman Torgan, who founded and ran the New Beverly Cinema, the last remaining full-time revival cinema in Los Angeles, died Wednesday of a heart attack while bicycling in Santa Monica, says The Hollywood Reporter. He was 63.


- Phil Morehart

"I felt humiliated and to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci. After the scene, Marlon didn't console me or apologise. Thankfully, there was just one take." - Maria Schneider talks about Last Tango in Paris on its 35th anniversary, in The Daily Mail.

Over 100 new titles in Poland, 350 features and shorts and 600 screenings in total is what the seventh edition of the Era New Horizons International Festival promises its public, notes Cineuropa.

The Sarajevo Film Festival, which runs Aug. 17-25, will hold its first ever Talent Campus this season. It will be run in co-operation with the Berlinale's successful Talent Campus.

Pirate copies of hit Czech pic Empties circulating on the Internet have been traced back to the Czech ministry of culture, reports Variety.

Sherman Torgan, who founded and ran the New Beverly Cinema, the last remaining full-time revival cinema in Los Angeles, died Wednesday of a heart attack while bicycling in Santa Monica, says The Hollywood Reporter. He was 63.


- Phil Morehart

Thursday, July 19, 2007



BBC's Jonathan Ross interviews Japanese auteur Takashi Miike.


- Phil Morehart



BBC's Jonathan Ross interviews Japanese auteur Takashi Miike.


- Phil Morehart

Tom Cruise is a one-eyed Nazi.

Milos Forman accidentally made an Iraq War movie with Goya's Ghost, says New York Magazine.

Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan turns 47 today.

South Africa's national broadcaster, SABC, has dropped a court action to halt the screenings of a documentary about President Thabo Mbeki, reports BBC News.

Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik ponders truth in documentary filmmaking for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

This summer is proving the apotheosis of the one-week blockbuster, according to David M. Halbfinger at The New York Times.


- Phil Morehart

Tom Cruise is a one-eyed Nazi.

Milos Forman accidentally made an Iraq War movie with Goya's Ghost, says New York Magazine.

Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan turns 47 today.

South Africa's national broadcaster, SABC, has dropped a court action to halt the screenings of a documentary about President Thabo Mbeki, reports BBC News.

Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik ponders truth in documentary filmmaking for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

This summer is proving the apotheosis of the one-week blockbuster, according to David M. Halbfinger at The New York Times.


- Phil Morehart

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Because they can, that's why. Image Entertainment is releasing three different Caligula DVD sets in October, says Movieweb.

Hey now! Juliette and the Licks put on a fairly decent live show! Cracked Magazine looks at The 10 Worst Celebrity Bands.

A retrospective on Pedro Almodóvar and a tribute to David Lynch will be the main events of the brand new Estoril European Film Festival, according to Cineuropa.

New films from David Cronenberg and Denys Arcand will receive the gala treatment at the Toronto International Film Festival, reports The Guardian.

"Watching most contemporary queer movies, particularly the American ones, is to see art reflect the downside of the progress achieved in the culture wars, in gays and lesbians securing that much-coveted “seat at the table.” - Ernest Hardy wonders if gay movies have stopped challenging their audiences, in L.A. Weekly.


- Phil Morehart

Because they can, that's why. Image Entertainment is releasing three different Caligula DVD sets in October, says Movieweb.

Hey now! Juliette and the Licks put on a fairly decent live show! Cracked Magazine looks at The 10 Worst Celebrity Bands.

A retrospective on Pedro Almodóvar and a tribute to David Lynch will be the main events of the brand new Estoril European Film Festival, according to Cineuropa.

New films from David Cronenberg and Denys Arcand will receive the gala treatment at the Toronto International Film Festival, reports The Guardian.

"Watching most contemporary queer movies, particularly the American ones, is to see art reflect the downside of the progress achieved in the culture wars, in gays and lesbians securing that much-coveted “seat at the table.” - Ernest Hardy wonders if gay movies have stopped challenging their audiences, in L.A. Weekly.


- Phil Morehart

Tuesday, July 17, 2007



I've been on a Kenneth Anger kick lately. The recently released collection, The Films of Kenneth Anger: Vol. One is godsent, but it's missing his 1981 occult freakout, Lucifer Rising. Criminally unavailable on DVD (hopefully, that will be remedied with Vol. Two), the short can be seen via the glory that is Youtube. Enjoy the tripped out finale above.


- Phil Morehart



I've been on a Kenneth Anger kick lately. The recently released collection, The Films of Kenneth Anger: Vol. One is godsent, but it's missing his 1981 occult freakout, Lucifer Rising. Criminally unavailable on DVD (hopefully, that will be remedied with Vol. Two), the short can be seen via the glory that is Youtube. Enjoy the tripped out finale above.


- Phil Morehart

Monday, July 16, 2007

"I wanted to slap the sh*t out of her." - Jacqueline Bisset reminisces about Liv Ullmann, at the Chicago International Film Festival's Summer Gala. Facets Features' Brian Elza has more at Facets.org.

Paulie Walnuts is a Republican. Who knew? CNN's The Ticker lists celebrity political donations.

Harry Kirkpatrick may be the new Alan Smithee, says The Guardian.

"...I propose, as the opposite of "chick flick" and an adjective of your very own, "prick flick." Not only will it serve film critics well, but its variants will add to the literary lexicon," says Gloria Steinhem at Women's Media Center.

The Brazil government is backing 28 local pics to the tune of 21 million reals ($11.2 million) from funds raised via tax incentives -- the largest production investment in Brazil this year, reports Variety.

Harry Potter cleaned house this weekend.


- Phil Morehart

"I wanted to slap the sh*t out of her." - Jacqueline Bisset reminisces about Liv Ullmann, at the Chicago International Film Festival's Summer Gala. Facets Features' Brian Elza has more at Facets.org.

Paulie Walnuts is a Republican. Who knew? CNN's The Ticker lists celebrity political donations.

Harry Kirkpatrick may be the new Alan Smithee, says The Guardian.

"...I propose, as the opposite of "chick flick" and an adjective of your very own, "prick flick." Not only will it serve film critics well, but its variants will add to the literary lexicon," says Gloria Steinhem at Women's Media Center.

The Brazil government is backing 28 local pics to the tune of 21 million reals ($11.2 million) from funds raised via tax incentives -- the largest production investment in Brazil this year, reports Variety.

Harry Potter cleaned house this weekend.


- Phil Morehart

Friday, July 13, 2007



The original trailer for the 1980 classic.


- Phil Morehart



The original trailer for the 1980 classic.


- Phil Morehart

Thursday, July 12, 2007

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Michael Moore vs. Sangay Gupta. Fight!

Alex Proyas (Dark City, The Crow) to direct Dracula prequel, Dracula Year Zero, according to Cinematical.

The Edinburgh International Film Festival unveiled its new line-up this morning, reports The Guardian. David Mackenzie's Hallam Foe will open the fest, while Two Days in Paris, a romantic comedy directed by Julie Delpy, will close.

"1980s action films are seriously messed up, but none is more whacked out than John Milius' crypto-fascist masterpiece Red Dawn, which has a Collector's Edition DVD out July 17. Today Red Dawn plays less like a Brat Pack action flick and more like the wettest dream Dick Cheney's ever had," says Mike Miley at The Huffington Post.

In celebration of British cinema, the UK Film Council is re-releasing some of the greatest movies British filsm ever made. Geoffrey Macnab reviews their selections in The Independent.


- Phil Morehart

Michael Moore vs. Sangay Gupta. Fight!

Alex Proyas (Dark City, The Crow) to direct Dracula prequel, Dracula Year Zero, according to Cinematical.

The Edinburgh International Film Festival unveiled its new line-up this morning, reports The Guardian. David Mackenzie's Hallam Foe will open the fest, while Two Days in Paris, a romantic comedy directed by Julie Delpy, will close.

"1980s action films are seriously messed up, but none is more whacked out than John Milius' crypto-fascist masterpiece Red Dawn, which has a Collector's Edition DVD out July 17. Today Red Dawn plays less like a Brat Pack action flick and more like the wettest dream Dick Cheney's ever had," says Mike Miley at The Huffington Post.

In celebration of British cinema, the UK Film Council is re-releasing some of the greatest movies British filsm ever made. Geoffrey Macnab reviews their selections in The Independent.


- Phil Morehart

Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Rescue Dawn (Werner Herzog, 2007) - Herzog pulls out the big guns to revisit the tale of Little Dieter, and it's damn good. But, why Werner, why the Teen Wolf ending? (Phil Morehart)

Destroy All Planets (Noriaki Yuasa, 1968) - As much as I loved this Z-Grade Gamera flick, I think I may be dumber for having watched it. I can't wait to see it again. (PM)

Screamers (Carla Garapedian, 2006) - My review of this rock concert/Armenian genocide doc can be found at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

The Abandoned (Nacho Cerdà, 2006) - Again, find my review at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

Sins of the Fleshapoids (Mike Kuchar, 1965)

The Holy Mountain (Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1973) - My brain is still recovering from the freaked-out perfection of my Sins of the the Fleshapoids / The Holy Mountain double feature from last weekend. (PM)

Paris, Je T’Aime (various directors, 2006) - Paris, I love you indeed. This film weaves the talents of 20 different directors in 18 vignettes that show why Paris, not Virginia, is for lovers. Each story is quite different from the next, but all share that most enchanting common thread - LOVE. With talents like Steve Buscemi, Juliette Binoche, Natalie Portman and Fanny Ardant, you can’t help but fall in love with this film. (Rosemary Nottoli)

The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939) – [opinion] Still the greatest film of all time![/opinion]. (Brian Elza)

The Doors (Oliver Stone, 1991)– Every time Jim Morrison (Val Kilmer) sees that Native American spirit guide of his, I can’t help but think of Wayne’s World 2. Crispin Glover makes a cameo appearance as Andy Warhol--a definite highlight in this bloated rocku-biopic. (BE)

American Psycho (Mary Harron, 2000) – Yeah, marketing this supremely ironic satire of the eighties as a simple horror flick was a great idea, Lions Gate. Nothing says disappointed and confused like a 16-year-old horror fan having to see Christian Bale recite a New Yorker-esque review of Huey Lewis and the News’ Sports before axing a dude in the face. This “bad object” (what up, psychoanalytic film theory) is just as timely as ever. (BE)

Better Luck Tomorrow (Justin Lin, 2003) – As my viewing partner astutely pointed out, “If I had to teach a class on the type of projects students make in film school, I’d show them this movie.” As the internet attests, director Justin Lin was, in fact, a UCLA Film School grad. Luckily, he’s out of that slump and making important statements like The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. (BE)

Women in Love (Ken Russell, 1969) – Poor Oliver Reed. He can’t just be his own emotionally-crippled tower of a man without having Glenda Jackson bitch at him for it. Maybe she was just jealous of that sweaty, full-frontal wrestling match between Reed and “best friend” Alan Bates. So, so good. (BE)

Marnie (Alfred Hitchcock, 1964) – Tippi Hedren is over her bird phobia and onto the color red. (BE)

Transformers (Michael Bay, 2007) – Like eating a cocaine covered Whooper. You feel great while you’re doing it, but downright shameful at your uber-coked gluttony when all is said and done.(BE)

Rescue Dawn (Werner Herzog, 2007) - Herzog pulls out the big guns to revisit the tale of Little Dieter, and it's damn good. But, why Werner, why the Teen Wolf ending? (Phil Morehart)

Destroy All Planets (Noriaki Yuasa, 1968) - As much as I loved this Z-Grade Gamera flick, I think I may be dumber for having watched it. I can't wait to see it again. (PM)

Screamers (Carla Garapedian, 2006) - My review of this rock concert/Armenian genocide doc can be found at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

The Abandoned (Nacho Cerdà, 2006) - Again, find my review at Cincinnati CityBeat's website. (PM)

Sins of the Fleshapoids (Mike Kuchar, 1965)

The Holy Mountain (Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1973) - My brain is still recovering from the freaked-out perfection of my Sins of the the Fleshapoids / The Holy Mountain double feature from last weekend. (PM)

Paris, Je T’Aime (various directors, 2006) - Paris, I love you indeed. This film weaves the talents of 20 different directors in 18 vignettes that show why Paris, not Virginia, is for lovers. Each story is quite different from the next, but all share that most enchanting common thread - LOVE. With talents like Steve Buscemi, Juliette Binoche, Natalie Portman and Fanny Ardant, you can’t help but fall in love with this film. (Rosemary Nottoli)

The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939) – [opinion] Still the greatest film of all time![/opinion]. (Brian Elza)

The Doors (Oliver Stone, 1991)– Every time Jim Morrison (Val Kilmer) sees that Native American spirit guide of his, I can’t help but think of Wayne’s World 2. Crispin Glover makes a cameo appearance as Andy Warhol--a definite highlight in this bloated rocku-biopic. (BE)

American Psycho (Mary Harron, 2000) – Yeah, marketing this supremely ironic satire of the eighties as a simple horror flick was a great idea, Lions Gate. Nothing says disappointed and confused like a 16-year-old horror fan having to see Christian Bale recite a New Yorker-esque review of Huey Lewis and the News’ Sports before axing a dude in the face. This “bad object” (what up, psychoanalytic film theory) is just as timely as ever. (BE)

Better Luck Tomorrow (Justin Lin, 2003) – As my viewing partner astutely pointed out, “If I had to teach a class on the type of projects students make in film school, I’d show them this movie.” As the internet attests, director Justin Lin was, in fact, a UCLA Film School grad. Luckily, he’s out of that slump and making important statements like The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. (BE)

Women in Love (Ken Russell, 1969) – Poor Oliver Reed. He can’t just be his own emotionally-crippled tower of a man without having Glenda Jackson bitch at him for it. Maybe she was just jealous of that sweaty, full-frontal wrestling match between Reed and “best friend” Alan Bates. So, so good. (BE)

Marnie (Alfred Hitchcock, 1964) – Tippi Hedren is over her bird phobia and onto the color red. (BE)

Transformers (Michael Bay, 2007) – Like eating a cocaine covered Whooper. You feel great while you’re doing it, but downright shameful at your uber-coked gluttony when all is said and done.(BE)

Monday, July 09, 2007

"Breathe a sigh of relief, The Simpsons Movie is brilliant," says Daniel Martin at The Guardian's Arts Blog.

Julian Schnabel is among the nominees announced by the Gucci Group and the Venice Film Festival for the Gucci Group Award, dedicated to personalities outside the movie industry who have made an outstanding contribution to a film, reports Variety.

Transformers destroys the box office.

John Barlow at Cinemaslave picks the ten best DVD commentary tracks.

Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik examines Barbet Schroeder's documentary, Terror's Advocate, for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

Michael Moore has turned down an offer to accompany Sicko to Iran, reports The Guardian.

"The phrase the camera loves her is one of those cliches that is supposed to defy analysis, but in (Isabelle) Huppert's case it's worth a try, for her long and ardent relationship with the lens is one where there has never been any doubt as to who's in control." Sandra Hall looks at the French star as a retrospective of her work opens at Sydney's Chauvel Cinema, in The Sydney Morning Herald.


- Phil Morehart

"Breathe a sigh of relief, The Simpsons Movie is brilliant," says Daniel Martin at The Guardian's Arts Blog.

Julian Schnabel is among the nominees announced by the Gucci Group and the Venice Film Festival for the Gucci Group Award, dedicated to personalities outside the movie industry who have made an outstanding contribution to a film, reports Variety.

Transformers destroys the box office.

John Barlow at Cinemaslave picks the ten best DVD commentary tracks.

Facets Executive Director Milos Stehlik examines Barbet Schroeder's documentary, Terror's Advocate, for Chicago Public Radio's Worldview.

Michael Moore has turned down an offer to accompany Sicko to Iran, reports The Guardian.

"The phrase the camera loves her is one of those cliches that is supposed to defy analysis, but in (Isabelle) Huppert's case it's worth a try, for her long and ardent relationship with the lens is one where there has never been any doubt as to who's in control." Sandra Hall looks at the French star as a retrospective of her work opens at Sydney's Chauvel Cinema, in The Sydney Morning Herald.


- Phil Morehart

Thursday, July 05, 2007

This is embarrassing. Wasn't Garfield bad enough? What happened to original thought, Hollywood? Do we need to call in The Awesom-O 4000 for some new ideas guys?

- Phil Morehart

This is embarrassing. Wasn't Garfield bad enough? What happened to original thought, Hollywood? Do we need to call in The Awesom-O 4000 for some new ideas guys?

- Phil Morehart

Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Tuesday, July 03, 2007


It's summer, so it's time to see stuff blow up, hardcore fisticuffs and high speed chases on the movie screens. Entertainment Weekly looks at the 25 Greatest Action Films Ever. Note* The selections are what you'd expect, but stick around until the end for the web-only addendum of the more-interesting selections cut from the print edition.

Woody Allen has revealed cast details for his new Barcelona-set film, reports Variety. Contrary to their reporting, though, multiple sources note that the film does indeed have a title: Midnight in Barcelona.

The French gangster film, Second Wind (Le Deuxieme Souffle), directed by Alain Corneau and starring Daniel Auteuil and Monica Bellucci, will open the RomaCinemaFest, says The Hollywood Reporter.

Danny Boyle will follow-up Sunshine with the curious true-life tale of a game show contestant, filmed in the ghettos of India, the director tells MTV's Movies Blog.

Three leading Arab film festivals have agreed that the Dubai International Film Festival will chair the proposed Arab Film Festival Guild, the first of its kind in the Arab world, reports AME Info.

From the movies to the real thing. Fresh off of Ghost Rider, Nic Cage gets into the comic book biz. USA Today has more.

Find films for a perfect Fourth of July at the Facets Videotheque.


- Phil Morehart


It's summer, so it's time to see stuff blow up, hardcore fisticuffs and high speed chases on the movie screens. Entertainment Weekly looks at the 25 Greatest Action Films Ever. Note* The selections are what you'd expect, but stick around until the end for the web-only addendum of the more-interesting selections cut from the print edition.

Woody Allen has revealed cast details for his new Barcelona-set film, reports Variety. Contrary to their reporting, though, multiple sources note that the film does indeed have a title: Midnight in Barcelona.

The French gangster film, Second Wind (Le Deuxieme Souffle), directed by Alain Corneau and starring Daniel Auteuil and Monica Bellucci, will open the RomaCinemaFest, says The Hollywood Reporter.

Danny Boyle will follow-up Sunshine with the curious true-life tale of a game show contestant, filmed in the ghettos of India, the director tells MTV's Movies Blog.

Three leading Arab film festivals have agreed that the Dubai International Film Festival will chair the proposed Arab Film Festival Guild, the first of its kind in the Arab world, reports AME Info.

From the movies to the real thing. Fresh off of Ghost Rider, Nic Cage gets into the comic book biz. USA Today has more.

Find films for a perfect Fourth of July at the Facets Videotheque.


- Phil Morehart

Monday, July 02, 2007



Jean-Luc Godard. The Rolling Stones. Sympathy for the Devil.


- Phil Morehart



Jean-Luc Godard. The Rolling Stones. Sympathy for the Devil.


- Phil Morehart

"The third anniversary of his death is as good a time as any to say this: there is not a performance in the history of cinema that is as raw as Marlon Brando's performance in Last Tango in Paris," says Mike Miley at The Huffington Post.

Edward Yang, director of Cannes-winner Yi Yi, has died. He was 59.

Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has turned down a chance to star in an Oliver Stone film, instead calling Stone, "part of the Great Satan," reports The Guardian.

As Michael Bay's latest behemoth heads to the cineplex, Cinematical looks at its progenitor, the 1986 animated film, Transformers: The Movie.

Desperate times call for desperate measures. Conservative bloggers try to link Michael Moore to UK terror attempts, reports Raw Story.

On a side note, Dracula's Castle is for sale.


- Phil Morehart

"The third anniversary of his death is as good a time as any to say this: there is not a performance in the history of cinema that is as raw as Marlon Brando's performance in Last Tango in Paris," says Mike Miley at The Huffington Post.

Edward Yang, director of Cannes-winner Yi Yi, has died. He was 59.

Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has turned down a chance to star in an Oliver Stone film, instead calling Stone, "part of the Great Satan," reports The Guardian.

As Michael Bay's latest behemoth heads to the cineplex, Cinematical looks at its progenitor, the 1986 animated film, Transformers: The Movie.

Desperate times call for desperate measures. Conservative bloggers try to link Michael Moore to UK terror attempts, reports Raw Story.

On a side note, Dracula's Castle is for sale.


- Phil Morehart